How much sugar is OK in pregnancy?

Can eating too much sugar harm my unborn baby?

Moms-to-Be: Too Much Sugar During Pregnancy Can Hurt Your Child’s Brain Function. A new study shows a high-sugar diet during pregnancy can negatively affect a child’s brain function.

Is sugar OK during pregnancy?

The Dietary Guidelines for Americans suggest that everyone limit intake of added sugars, to less than 10% of daily calories. However, it’s more prudent to avoid any added sugars while pregnant and to skip juice and any beverages beyond breast milk (or formula) and n babies and toddlers.

What happens if you have sugar during pregnancy?

Gestational diabetes raises your risk of high blood pressure, as well as preeclampsia — a serious complication of pregnancy that causes high blood pressure and other symptoms that can threaten the lives of both mother and baby. Having a surgical delivery (C-section).

Is 160 blood sugar high in pregnancy?

A blood sugar level of 190 milligrams per deciliter (mg/dL), or 10.6 millimoles per liter (mmol/L) indicates gestational diabetes. A blood sugar below 140 mg/dL (7.8 mmol/L) is usually considered normal on a glucose challenge test, although this may vary by clinic or lab.

How can I limit my sugar during pregnancy?

Sweets and desserts should be avoided as they may lead to high blood sugar levels.

  1. Eat 3 meals and 2–3 snacks per day. …
  2. Measure your servings of starchy foods. …
  3. One 8-ounce cup of milk at a time. …
  4. One small portion of fruit at a time. …
  5. Eat more fiber. …
  6. Breakfast Matters. …
  7. Avoid fruit juice and sugary drinks.
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What is too much sugar?

How Much Is Too Much? 2 / 15. The American Heart Association recommends no more than 6 teaspoons (25 grams) of added sugar a day for women and 9 teaspoons (36 grams) for men. But the average American gets way more: 22 teaspoons a day (88 grams).

Does sugar make your baby bigger?

Extra sugar or glucose in the blood crosses the placenta and enters the fetus, raising its blood sugar levels. This causes the baby to produce excessive amounts of the hormone insulin, which lowers blood glucose. The high sugar intake and extra insulin cause the baby to grow too large, a condition called macrosomia.